Airport Entry and Exit Group

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DSS, on behalf of the Document Security Alliance, has joined the Airport Entry and Exit Working Group.

This is a representative group of identity and biometric industry experts urging Congressional action to assure Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) implementation of viable and sustainable biometric entry and exit solutions.

To read more about the effort, click here.

Major Retailers to Take a Hit this Holiday Season

UnhappyShopper

Looks like major retailers could be experiencing a big hit this holiday season.  According to CreditCards.com nearly half of cardholders are likely to avoid stores hit by data breaches.

Here are they study’s highlights:

  • 45% percent of respondents with credit or debit cards said they would definitely or probably avoid one of their regular stores over the holidays if that retailer had experienced a data breach.
  • 16% percent said they definitely would not return to a retailer if the store had been hacked
  • 29% said they probably would not shop at such stores.

These results come from a survey of randomly selected 865 American adults who have debit or credit cards conducted by landline and cellphone October 2-5th for CreditCards.com by Princeton Survey Research Associates International.

What do you think? Will you be avoiding the major retailers this year? Let us know in the comments! 

AuthentiSite helps protect consumers and brand owners alike from the threat of security breaches. To learn more, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com

Everything You Need to Know About the Home Depot Data Breach

Via New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/technology/path-of-stolen-credit-cards-leads-back-to-home-depot.html

Via New York Times

What happened?
Targeted by cyber criminals, Home Depot has been the latest victim in a major credit card data breach. It is estimated that this attack effects thousands of consumers’ credit and debit card information. Should the evidence uncovered so far prove to be valid, the hack could be bigger than last year’s record-setting Target breach.

What information did they get?
As of right now, the answer to this question is unclear. However, it can be assumed that the hackers have access to all typical billing information such as: the cardholder’s name, card number, billing zip code, security code and expiration date.

Where is the stolen information being used?
According to the New York Times, thousands of fresh credit and debit card numbers have surfaced on so-called carding sites, which are websites where stolen credit card data is sold. On these sites, hackers are selling the stolen account information for as much as $50 per card. From here, cyber criminals can use this information for anything from illegal online purchases to identity theft.

Should I be concerned?
While Home Depot is working hard with law enforcement and their banking partners to get this under control, if you have shopped at Home Depot with either a credit or debit card, you should be on the lookout for any usual activity.

What should I do now?
If you have shopped at Home Depot and used a credit card, keep a close eye on your statement. Any unfamiliar charges should be immediately reported to your financial institution.

If you used a debit card at Home Depot, you may want to ask your bank to issue you a new account number and consider moving any money you can to another account. Unlike credit cards, any unlawful purchases on your debit card comes directly from the cash in your bank account. This could cause an overdraft and/or leave you without money. While most financial institutions replace the stolen money, it rarely happens quickly. 

Finally, the information gathered by the hackers could be used in a later attack – such as a phishing email. Be suspicious of any email, phone call or text that claims to be your bank, Home Depot or law enforcement. Avoid clicking any links or replying with any personal information.

 

DSS and AuthentiSite have solutions that would help put an end to these cyber attacks. To learn more, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com 

To sign up for our free informational webinar please click here.

Did They Get Your Customer’s Usernames and Passwords?

Early last week, in what some are calling the “biggest internet heist in history”, Russian hackers amassed over one billion username and password combinations.

This comes not even a year after 40 million credit card numbers were stolen from a major retailer – causing experts and consumers alike to wonder if keeping personal information out of the hands of thieves is a loosing battle.

DSS is here to tell you, it’s not.

Our AuthentiSite solution provides true, two-factor authentication for websites through the use of our patented Prism mark and a smartphone application.

Are phishing emails targeting your customers?
Are you having issues with counterfeit websites or products damaging your brands reputation?Would you like consumers to inform you when they have encountered counterfeit websites?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, our free informational webinar on September 8th at 2pm EST is for you.

Click here to register.

During this quick half-hour session, you will learn:

  1. How to identify the real dangers to your brand
  2. Current technologies and solutions
  3. Ways to create proactive customer involvement

Click here to register.

We look forward to your attendance! In the meantime, should you have any questions about our products and services, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com

Today’s Growing Cyber Threats

cybersecurity

Earlier this week, in what some are calling the “biggest internet heist in history”, Russian hackers amassed over one billion username and password combinations and more than 500 million email addresses.

This comes not even a year after 40 million credit card numbers were stolen from Target and cyber criminals attacked Adobe’s databases – causing experts and consumers alike to wonder if keeping personal information out of the hands of thieves is a losing battle.

What do these thieves want with your usernames and passwords? For the Russians in particular, they were using the logins to spam weight loss ads on social media accounts for, what is believed to be, third party groups. Although some credentials have been sold to the black market, many remain in the hands of the Russian Gang. Should these professional criminals decide to sell the information, it would be very lucrative for the gang.

While a credit cards can be cancelled, things such as an email address or social security number are easy targets for identity theft. Consumers tend to use the same email and passwords for several different websites. Criminals take these credentials and test them on websites that hold valuable information, such as banks or brokerage firms.

“Companies that rely on usernames and passwords have to develop a sense of urgency about changing this,” said Avivah Litan, a security analyst at the research firm Gartner. “Until they do, criminals will just keep stockpiling people’s credentials.

This is where DSS’s AuthentiSite Solution comes in. By implementing AuthentiSite, consumers will know they are on a trusted website, and brand owners will be able to verify it is a customer, not a hacker, on their website.

For example; John Smith will be able to verify he is on his trusted banking website (not a fake, phishing site) and the bank will be able to verify that John Smith is accessing his own account.

It all starts with our patented Prism mark. This mark’s security technology is tied into our secure server making it virtually impossible for criminals to duplicate the mark on illegal or fraudulent websites.

If you are interested in learning more, please sign up for our free, informational webinar on September 8th at 2pm EST. During this webinar, industry experts will discuss AuthentiSite and how the program is being continuously developed to end cyber attacks.

To register, click here.

In the meantime, to learn how AuthentiGuard can help protect brand owners and consumers alike, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com

Source

Illicit Cigarette Problems? AuthentiGuard Can Help.

Last week, DSS explained just how bad the illicit cigarette trade is for consumers – to read the full story click here.

This is a growing problems that costs consumer’s their health and the tobacco manufactures hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

But what if we told you there was a brand protection solution that would help solve this problem and save your company money?

AuthentiGuard is that solution.

Interested in learning more? If so, than our free informational webinar on August 11th at 3pm is for you.

Click here to register

During this half hour session, we will explain:

  1. The Real Dangers to Your Brand
  2. Current Technologies and Solutions
  3. Ways to Create Proactive Customer Involvement

Click here to register

Should you have any questions about registering, please contact Kaitlyn White at kwhite@DSSsecure.com

Counterfeits Where You Least Expect Them.

Pretty Woman Holding Pill BottleCounterfeiting has become a $500 billion a year industry, and designer purses are no longer the number one victim. The number of ordinary household products being counterfeited has recently grown exponentially, quickly gaining the attention of officials. 

Below are just a few examples of counterfeit products reported in the last year: 

1. Vapor Rub
Applied to the skin, typically this rub is used to assist in opening up airways when someone is battling a cold. Counterfeit versions have been popping up in stores in New York, Pennsylvania and Florida leading to the arrest of two brothers on Long Island. Other products these brothers were counterfeiting include ChapStick and baby oil. (Source

2. Batteries

Knock-off batteries have been appearing in stores for quite sometime. Their higher price tag appeals to counterfeiters but, since these criminals are not concerned with quality, knock-off batteries do not work as effectively as their authentic version. The real danger however, lies in the packaging. If the counterfeit batteries are not sealed correctly, the corrosive acid and heat combination could lead to explosion. (Source)

3. Razors
Knock-off Gillette razors have been found in stores across America. These razors are created using materials of inferior quality in substandard facilities. They could quickly become dangerous to anyone using them by causing cuts and/or infections. (Source)

4. Laundry Detergent:
An article from CBS Los Angeles lists counterfeit laundry detergent as a target for officials in California. Counterfeit products are not subject to any FDA regulations which makes its almost impossible to know exactly what you are buying. These products could be diluted, damaged, expired or filled with harmful chemicals that could harm you or your family. (Source

5. Wine:
A UK article released earlier this week claims that there is a 1 in 5 chance that the wine at your local store is fake. These potentially harmful, low quality wines come with convincing high-end labels, making it difficult to spot the fake. Again, as there is no regulation behind counterfeits, illegal alcohol can contain chemicals used in cleaning products, screen wash and antifreeze. (Source)

 

Brand owners advise consumers to be cognizant of where they purchase their products and to always consider how much they are paying for them. However, this “buyer beware” mentality isn’t always effective and can put consumers at risk. This is why DSS strives to provide brand owners with a comprehensive solution to their counterfeiting solutions. 

To learn how AuthentiGuard can protect consumers and brands alike from counterfeit products, please visit www.authentiguard.com