Everything You Need to Know About the Home Depot Data Breach

Via New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/04/technology/path-of-stolen-credit-cards-leads-back-to-home-depot.html

Via New York Times

What happened?
Targeted by cyber criminals, Home Depot has been the latest victim in a major credit card data breach. It is estimated that this attack effects thousands of consumers’ credit and debit card information. Should the evidence uncovered so far prove to be valid, the hack could be bigger than last year’s record-setting Target breach.

What information did they get?
As of right now, the answer to this question is unclear. However, it can be assumed that the hackers have access to all typical billing information such as: the cardholder’s name, card number, billing zip code, security code and expiration date.

Where is the stolen information being used?
According to the New York Times, thousands of fresh credit and debit card numbers have surfaced on so-called carding sites, which are websites where stolen credit card data is sold. On these sites, hackers are selling the stolen account information for as much as $50 per card. From here, cyber criminals can use this information for anything from illegal online purchases to identity theft.

Should I be concerned?
While Home Depot is working hard with law enforcement and their banking partners to get this under control, if you have shopped at Home Depot with either a credit or debit card, you should be on the lookout for any usual activity.

What should I do now?
If you have shopped at Home Depot and used a credit card, keep a close eye on your statement. Any unfamiliar charges should be immediately reported to your financial institution.

If you used a debit card at Home Depot, you may want to ask your bank to issue you a new account number and consider moving any money you can to another account. Unlike credit cards, any unlawful purchases on your debit card comes directly from the cash in your bank account. This could cause an overdraft and/or leave you without money. While most financial institutions replace the stolen money, it rarely happens quickly. 

Finally, the information gathered by the hackers could be used in a later attack – such as a phishing email. Be suspicious of any email, phone call or text that claims to be your bank, Home Depot or law enforcement. Avoid clicking any links or replying with any personal information.

 

DSS and AuthentiSite have solutions that would help put an end to these cyber attacks. To learn more, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com 

To sign up for our free informational webinar please click here.

Shopping Safe Online – The Golf Addition

Golf ball on white tee and golf club preparing to shot.

A few weeks ago we posted an article about counterfeit golf apparel, clubs and accessories and how they were making their way into homes of unknowing consumers.

Today, we’re going to be talking about how to avoid buying counterfeit golf clubs and accessories online. With KeepGolfReal.com removing more than 250 fake golf websites last year, the problem is real and growing.

Below are a few tips and tricks to make sure you are shopping safe online:

  1. Feedback: Always check the reviews before purchasing a golf club online. If there are several complaints about a product not shipping, the products quality or the website’s poor customer service, these could all be signs that you are dealing with a fake website.
  2. Great Deal: Even on auction websites, if the deal is too good to be true, it is. Often times knock-off sellers will justify the low cost as “received as gift” or “won in a raffle.” Don’t let it deceive you – it’s fake.
  3. Serial Numbers: When in doubt, ask for the serial number. If the company or seller refuses to provide it to you, it is a clear indicator that it is not a real product.

Always remember, if you are curious about whether you are on a true authorized reseller of the product you are looking to purchase, you can always check with the manufacture. Many times manufacture websites will gladly provide a list of their licensed resellers.

DSS and AuthentiSite can help consumer and brand owners alike prove website’s authenticity. To learn more, please visit www.AuthentiGuard.com